Chavez, climate change and the venality of academics

Dear Climate-L, I would like to share this short article with you on Venezuela’s climate change policy following the passing of President Hugo Chávez. Given that Venezuela holds the world’s largest known oil reserves its role at the U.N. climate negotiations is pivotal. We question whether Venezuela will be a key architect of a new deal in 2015 or if it will sabotage progress. We suggest Venezuela can rebrand itself as a proactive actor both at home and at the U.N. climate negotiations.

http://www.intercambioclimatico.com/en/2013/03/07/death-of-hugo-chavez-gives-venezuela-a-choice-on-climate-change/

We hope the piece is of interest. Any feedback would be welcome.

Best wishes,

Guy


Research Fellow
Center for Environmental Studies
Brown University
Box 1943
135 Angell Street
Providence, RI 02912

http://www.intercambioclimatico.com/
http://twitter.com/GuyEdwards

The STAGGERING levels of hypocrisy and colonialism in this!! They are to blame for having oil reserves and wanting to develop their country perhaps. So unreasonable, these yokels. Clearly haven’t been to the best universities.
Meanwhile, the US, which has been stealing every other fucker’s oil, land etc etc for 230 years is somehow not the main villain (alongside, maybe, the British?). And it has never of course “sabotaged the process.” When I talk about academics as whores and parasites, this is what I had in mind. But I am expecting some whores and parasites to sue me for libel for implying they are as corrupt and venal as academics.

To be clear. I am not saying Chavez was one iota less hypocritical than pretty much every other leader (or human being, for that matter) on the subject of climate change. I am not saying that “Ecuador’s fascinating plan to be proposed at the next Opec meeting to create a 3-5% ‘Daly-Correa’ tax on every barrel of oil exported to rich countries to raid billions for poor countries to adapt to climate change” – is anything other than a damn fine idea.

I AM saying that when you write an article slagging off a poor country for “sabotaging” the process, you have a moral and intellectual duty to call out the big villains, even if it’s only for a sentence or three.

Advertisements

About dwighttowers

Below the surface...
This entry was posted in activism and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Chavez, climate change and the venality of academics

  1. Sam Gunsch says:

    Agreed.
    re: I AM saying that when you write an article slagging off a poor country for “sabotaging” the process, you have a moral and intellectual duty to call out the big villains, even if it’s only for a sentence or three. ”

    related:

    Media : Chavez failed to build gigantic skyscrapers
    http://creekside1.blogspot.ca/2013/03/media-chavez-failed-to-build-gigantic.html

    orginal source:
    http://www.fair.org/blog/2013/03/06/ap-chavez-wasted-his-money-on-healthcare-when-he-could-have-built-gigantic-skyscrapers/

    …the business press weighs in on some Chavez failings that presumably ought to be “pro-actively” remedied if Venezuela comes to its senses and seeks approval by the West’s elites.

    excerpts:

    ” “Many vile and stupid editorials have been written … but none of them are quite as honest as this one from business writers at Associated Press :”

    “”Chavez invested Venezuela’s oil wealth into social programs including state-run food markets, cash benefits for poor families, free health clinics and education programs. But those gains were meager compared with the spectacular construction projects that oil riches spurred in glittering Middle Eastern cities, including the world’s tallest building in Dubai and plans for branches of the Louvre and Guggenheim museums in Abu Dhabi.”.””

  2. Sam Gunsch says:

    … good summary by a Canadian journalist, and professor of journalism as to why Chavez is hated by the West’s elites.

    http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/03/09/latin_america_rewriting_its_role_as_us_doormat_burman.html
    Hugo Chavez legacy will reverberate beyond Venezuela: Burman

    The distinction of Latin America in today’s global political context is that it is far more independent of the United States than other regions.

    excerpt:
    by Tony Burman, former head of Al Jazeera English and CBC News, teaches journalism at Ryerson University. tony.burman@gmail.com

    “When Chavez was elected in 1998, his government replaced decades of corrupt and greedy rule by political and business elites — openly supported by the United States — who squandered the nation’s wealth.

    During his years as president, millions of Venezuelans received health care for the first time. Extreme poverty was reduced by 70 per cent and access to public education increased dramatically. Illiteracy has virtually been eradicated.

    Above all, the vast Venezuelan majority, marginalized and ignored by governments in past decades, assumed a dignity and pride of place that had been unheard of in the modern Latin American political culture.

    Since September 2001, the United States has virtually ignored the region, and the Latin American response has been eye-opening.

    The populist approach by Chavez, which challenged conventional political and economic thinking, has been contagious.

    This is the one region that did not respond to the 2008 global recession with across-the-board austerity. Instead, several governments expanded public services, reduced poverty and inequality, and nationalized key industries. The result has been strong economies and a string of popular governments that have actually been reelected.

    Apart from Chavez, who won last October’s presidential election in Venezuela with an 11 per cent margin, the latest example of this is Rafael Correa, reelected last month as Ecuador’s president with 57 per cent of the vote. Last year, Latin America’s first indigenous president, Evo Morales, was elected in Bolivia and, in 2009, Dilma Rousseff was voted in as president of Brazil.

    The distinction of Latin America in today’s global political context is that it is far more independent of the United States than other regions, such as Europe or — dare I say — Canada. And that is a staggering irony given its history in the past century of being a virtual vassal, or doormat, of the U.S.”

    ========
    Not that his petro-fueled programs are sustainable as presently operated… but the people hugely benefited from that petro-money …except for missing those skyscrapers of course…

    Canada and my province by contrast are letting the petro-profits be vacuumed out by international corporations including state corporations. We just ran another provincial budget deficit in 2012. I think it’s our 7th in a row!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s