Oi Vey, what’s it with always doing the urgent instead of the important?

Even when you know precisely what you are doing?

Falling for the short-term reward thing (which is how Tetris always got me!). And after a few hours, you’ve sent a gazillion emails, and cleared a to do list. But the big hairy audacious goal is no closer to completion.

It’s not enough to make me question planning (cough cough), but it is enough to make me question my will-power and the value of all this so-called self-knowledge that I keep blathering on about…

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About dwighttowers

Below the surface...
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2 Responses to Oi Vey, what’s it with always doing the urgent instead of the important?

  1. Sam Gunsch, Procrastinator MVP, Pleasantview, 2001-2011 says:

    re: enough to make me question my will-power

    “…unlisted items will return to our minds at unwelcome moments and cause suffering. ”
    ==============================

    “These items represent agreements you haven’t kept with yourself,” Allen says. “What happens when you break an agreement with yourself is that your self-esteem plummets.”

    http://www.wired.com/techbiz/people/magazine/15-10/ff_allen?currentPage=all

    Allen recommends … The project list is not a reminder of values or deeply held beliefs. Rather, it is an exhaustive external repository meant to capture every single thing that you may want to do.
    ==============
    The project list must contain everything, otherwise unlisted items will return to our minds at unwelcome moments and cause suffering.
    ===============================
    A New Age cliché holds that every intention generates a chain of spiritual effects we ignore at our peril. This is karma.
    ==========================
    In GTD, karma makes the last stage of its journey from a Hindu theory of cosmic justice to a rational tool in the American self-help kit. Karma is now just an open loop.
    ====================
    As ever-more complicated communication networks both extend our reach and hem us in, Allen’s strict routines supply exact instructions on how to manage ourselves.
    =========================
    This ambitious mind-set, with its combination of boldness and conventionality, says something about where Getting Things Done is coming from, and to whom it is aimed. The book is for people who are striving hard. “The people who take to GTD are the most organized people,” Allen says, “but they self-assess as the least organized, because they are well-enough organized to know that they are fucking up.”
    ===========================

  2. leavergirl says:

    Heh. Oh nooo, perish the thought planning should be questioned! The self-important inner planner always deflects the attention and attacks the will as the culprit.

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