“Long lefty laundry lists” – great post about ‘em…

There’s a must-read post over at “BeyondtheChoir” –

…. Also, there have been some folks working locally to stop a proposed waste incinerator. We should definitely have someone from that group speak at the rally. Wow, if we list all of these issues on one flyer, then we can attract a lot more people than the folks who would come out just because of the war or any one of the issues on its own….

But a strong moral narrative is different than just throwing a bunch of seemingly disparate issues onto the same flyer and assuming that we’ll be able to connect with anything other than an already highly politicized—and particularly politicized—audience (aka “the usual suspects”). What this kind of approach tends to do is to attract self-selecting individuals who come to the event as individuals. They may come as individuals from many different social backgrounds, with relationships to different social blocs. But these social blocs are not bought in, which means small numbers and few resources for the effort. Rallies are supposed to be demonstrations of grassroots organization and power (in order to leverage pressure to affect political change). But they can all too easily accomplish the opposite of this intention; they can be demonstrations of disorganization, powerlessness, and even incoherence (i.e. disconnection from any organized social base).

Ah yes, the difference between a protest and a demonstration

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About dwighttowers

Below the surface...
This entry was posted in a little self-knowledge, activism, competence and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to “Long lefty laundry lists” – great post about ‘em…

  1. Bill Raymond says:

    Yes – narrative: not as a (postmodern) substitute for praxis, but as an essential element of it. Without a strong organising, integrative, alliance binding and moral narrative there is little hope of sustained and effective action.

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