The FT, the Guardian and Deep Throat

In his obit of Mark Felt, FT 20th December, Jurek Martin concludes with this:

“He escaped implication in Watergate for years but Mr Felt did encounter legal problems of his own. After leaving the agency which he joined in 1942, he was convicted in 1981 for unauthorised FBI break-ins at homes of alleged radicals in the 1970, but was pardoned by President Ronald Reagan. He then retired to California.”

The Guardian, that noble little bast…ion of liberal values, didn’t see fit to tell its readers this, at least in the paper version I saw. There is something in the online version here.

It’s something I’ve noticed- the FT actually is MORE willing to talk about state power, and to give extreme left artists etc a fair hearing, than the Guardian. Can I prove this? No, I haven’t had the time or the patience to do a comparative analysis, a la Herman and Chomsky. Someday mabe…

Other comparison- I watched Silence of the Lambs at the cinema in Australia and on video in the US. In the latter, somebody had edited out this bit

Jack Crawford: I remember you from my seminar at UVA. You grilled me pretty hard, as I recall, on the bureau’s civil rights record in the Hoover years. I gave you an A.
Clarice Starling: A-minus, Sir.

This sort of censorship is not uncommon. And the bigger picture is that movies “critical” of the US military get no co-operation from said military. The classic, but trivial, example is the “Gene Hackman goes mad” cold-war thriller Crimson Tide…

PS The break-ins that Jurek Martin mentions were part of a programme that went all the way up to murder…)

PPS See also Cril Payne’s “Deep Cover”, for an extraordinary account of an undercover agent virtually stranded by the uncertainty around the Hoover succession.

About dwighttowers

Below the surface...
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